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One of the street favorites of South India is Parotta. Originating as Malabar Parotta in Kerala, Parotta has made its presence all over South India in various versions. Soft, crisp, chewy and flaky, Parotta, is usually served with salna or kurma. Parotta with Salna is a common street food in Tamil Nadu and Kerala. Chicken with some bones and skin is the flavor riser in a salna. Vegetarian version is made with potato, cauliflower, beans. Paired with vegetarian or non -vegetarian gravy, the delectable Parotta becomes irresistible.

The process of making Parotta involves mixing of the dough, slathering a generous amount of oil on it, resting it, and then pinching off tennis sized balls from the dough. Each of these balls is flattened and deftly tossed in the air to create a super thin translucent layer. This is pleated into a long thick strip which is then coiled into a circle like a rosette.  With more oil drizzled on it, the rosette is rolled out into slightly thick concentric rotis and fried on a hot tawa till golden brown. Bingo! Parotta is ready.

This Indian specialty comes in all forms, variants, and sizes! Being as versatile the favorite breakfast of India that it is, Parotta is the first and true love of every Indian- simple, feel good and heartwarming.

The most popular variations of this ubiquitous Parotta of South India include Coin Parotta,  Veech Parotta, Ceylon Parotta,  Kothu Parotta, and  Chilli Parotta . The Malabar Parotta is the base for all the other Parotta variations.

Coin Parotta differs from Malabar Parotta not in taste or ingredients, but only in size. While Malabar Parotta is very big and filling by itself, the coin parotta is smaller and easier to make as well as eat.

Veech Parotta is popular in Tamil Nadu. The ingredients are the same, but the Parotta is folded before it is fried in the shape of a square envelope.

Ceylon Parotta is a delicacy with two layers instead of one; it is stuffed with minced meat, and can even be eaten without a side dish and is extremely satisfying.

Kothu Parotta is very popular in the street shops all over Tamil Nadu. The Parotta is shredded into small pieces and tossed with chicken, eggs, gravy and vegetables. It makes a very filling meal and the taste is to die for.

Chilli Parotta is more or less a vegetarian version of Kothu Parotta, made with onions, capsicum and tomato sauce and of course, chillies. While the Kothu parotta is moist and soft, the chilli parotta is more crisp and chewy.

Other variations of Parotta aren’t exactly traditional but are absolutely lip smacking delicious! They include Green Peas Parotta, Pudina Parotta and Egg Parotta too! Parottas, however, tend to be somewhat unhealthy. Since this Parotta uses all-purpose flour, it should not be kept for a long time to eat as the maida in it becomes rubbery and hard to chew if eaten after a long time.

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