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Undoubtedly, breakfasts are the most important and exciting part of the day. A good and healthy breakfast marks not only the breaking of overnight fast in the morning but also the start of a new day, renewed with hope and aspirations to take on the world and the challenges ahead. However, relishing a good and healthy breakfast has become an experience to seek after than a life to live in the recent age of Corporate Moghuls. Starting the day with just the right food, makes the whole day pass quickly and energetically. Appam is perfectly healthy and a perfect meal for a nutritious breakfast. Many foods from South Indian cuisine such as Appam are fermented and thus enriched with Vitamin B-12. So they are easy to digest and are suitable for intestine. In this way, it is beneficial for the entire digestive system in every way.

Appams are tasty lacy soft hoppers made from a ground, fermented rice and coconut batter. It makes for a great breakfast option. Made with rice batter much like dosa, appams are usually savored with vegetable stew, but can also be enjoyed with non-vegetarian sides. Also, Appam is good for health as it contains useful nutrients and protein. It is low in calories, so it helps in keeping obesity away and maintains good health.

Traveling through the ages, Appam has made its way to become one of the few recipes mentioned in the Sangam Literature of Ancient Tamils. During its time, Appam has travelled across the southern part of the subcontinent and its neighboring countries, becoming an integral part of each of their culture, giving rise to different varieties and flavors along the way.

Neyyappam, made with rice flour, jaggery, clarified butter ghee, is native to the South Indian state Kerala where it is a favourite snack among the locals.

Unni Appam, a variation of Neyyappam has plantain mixed with the batter. The batter is poured into appakadai or appakaram, which has the ghee heated to a high temperature. Unni appams take the shape of small cups and are fried until deep brown.

Idiyappam, also known as Noolputtu or String Hoppers, is another variety made from rice noodles curled into flat spirals. It is often eaten with meat curries or Sodhi (a type of coconut milk curry) in the cities of South India and Sri Lanka. In Indonesia, kue apem, a variant of appam  , is a traditional cake of steamed dough made of rice flour, coconut milk, yeast and palm sugar, usually served with grated coconut.

At Amma’s South Indian Restaurant, Appam is served with coconut milk and Veg kurma or with any one of these: chicken, mutton or egg kurma. This dish is purely gluten free, dairy free and nut free! Visit Amma’s South Indian Restaurant and relish our Appams!

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